Schiffbruch mit tiger

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Schiffbruch mit Tiger ist ein im Jahr erschienener Roman des kanadischen Schriftstellers Yann Martel. Die deutsche Übersetzung von Manfred Allié und Gabriele Kempf-Allié erschien im S. Schiffbruch mit Tiger (englischer Originaltitel Life of Pi) ist ein im Jahr erschienener Roman des kanadischen Schriftstellers Yann Martel. Die deutsche​. Life of Pi: Schiffbruch mit Tiger. aus Wikipedia, der freien Enzyklopädie. Zur Navigation springen Zur Suche springen. Filmdaten. Deutscher. Schiffbruch mit Tiger: Roman | Martel, Yann, Allié, Manfred, Kempf-Allié, Gabriele | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand. Schiffbruch mit Tiger? Diese Geschichte würden Sie nicht glauben? Kein Wunder​. Fantastisch. Verwegen. Atemberaubend. Wahnsinnig komisch. Eine Geschichte​.

schiffbruch mit tiger

Schiffbruch mit Tiger. swedishwineassociation.ser, S., EUR 19, Ich bin jetzt Seit meinem , Lebensjahr habe ich vom Schreiben gelebt. Ich lebe sehr einfach. Und es gibt Menschen wie Piscine Molitor Patel. Im September erschien der Roman The Life of Pi (Schiffbruch mit Tiger) des Franko-. Schiffbruch mit Tiger ist ein im Jahr erschienener Roman des kanadischen Schriftstellers Yann Martel. Die deutsche Übersetzung von Manfred Allié und Gabriele Kempf-Allié erschien im S. Schiffbruch mit Tiger. swedishwineassociation.ser, S., EUR 19, Ich bin jetzt Seit meinem , Lebensjahr habe ich vom Schreiben gelebt. Ich lebe sehr einfach. Und es gibt Menschen wie Piscine Molitor Patel. Im September erschien der Roman The Life of Pi (Schiffbruch mit Tiger) des Franko-. Yann Martel: Schiffbruch mit Tiger (Buchbesprechung mit ausführlicher Inhaltsangabe und Rezension auf swedishwineassociation.se).

Schiffbruch Mit Tiger Inhaltsverzeichnis

Die Tiere sind für den Schiffbrüchigen die letzte Verbindung zu dem Leben, aus dem ihn das Unglück gerissen hat. Entsprechend organisierte er sein Leben. Pi ist ein unsympathischer und nerviger Hauptcharakter und das Buch zieht sich endlos. Ansichten Lesen Bearbeiten Quelltext bearbeiten Versionsgeschichte. Pi wird vorübergehend kinoxx.to, seine Augen trocknen aus. Filme von Ang Lee. Schiffbruch mit Tiger? Vereinigte Staaten [1]. Erst gegen Ende kam wieder etwas Spannung auf, als die lange Zeit auf See Pi körperlich und geistig immer mehr verkommen lässt. Mit dem Geld wollte die Familie neu anfangen. Vertreter der japanischen Firma, der das untergegangene Schiff gehört, suchen Pi auf, um von ihm zu hören, was mit dem Schiff damals geschah. Er will sie beschützen und er muss sich vor ihnen schützen. Ich wollte also diese unwahrscheinliche Prämisse eines Jungen und eines Tigers zusammen continue reading einem Rettungsboot nehmen und sie, indem ich realistische Details einfügte, glaubwürdig machen. Freude Netflix flash Artikel ist eine wunderbare Weihnachtserzählung. Es soll ihm so gehen wie den Japanern, als Pi sie visit web page, welche der beiden Geschichten ihnen besser gefällt. Der ist Direktor eines kleinen Zoos in Pondicherry, honert hedi wissbegieriger und kluger Mann, der seinen Kindern Respekt vor den Tieren beibringt, ihnen deren Verhaltensmuster erklärt.

Schiffbruch Mit Tiger Video

Clip 2 "Fliegende Fische" - LIFE OF PI: Schiffbruch mit Tiger - (Full HD)

It is how we understand it, no? And in understanding something, we bring something to it, no? But to understand this piece to be something indescribable, something godlike, is by far the greater leap of faith.

Oh, but worth the leap, if the reader is like that atheist, willing to see the better story. View all comments.

I found a lot of this book incredibly tedious. So, being told a book is a winner of the Booker tends to be a mark against it from the start, unfortunately.

Apparently, when Yann Martel wrote this he was feeling a bit down and this was his way of plucking himself up.

Well, good on him. I was a little annoyed when I found out that the person the book is dedicated to had also written a story about a man in a boat with a wild cat and had considered suing for plagiarism.

The book is written by a member of that class of people who are my least favourite; a religious person who cannot conceive of someone not being religious.

But the religious are generally terribly arrogant, so it is best not to feel insulted by their endless insults — they know not what they do.

Parts of this were so badly over written that it was almost enough to make me stop reading. The bit where he is opening his first can of water is a case in point.

This takes so long and is so incidental to the story and written in such a cutesy way that I started to pray the boat would sink, the tiger would get him … I would even have accepted God smiting him at this point as a valid plotting point, even if or particularly because it would bring the story to an abrupt end.

This is a book told as two possible stories of how a young man survives for days floating across the Pacific Ocean told in chapters.

That was the other thing that I found annoying — much is made of the fact this story is told in chapters — but I could not feel any necessity for many of the chapters.

You know, in Invisible Cities Calvino has necessary chapters — this book just has chapters. It was something that annoyed me from early on in the book — that the chapters seemed far too arbitrary and pointing it out at the end just made me more irritated.

Pi is the central character in the book who, for some odd reason, is named after a swimming pool — I started playing with the ideas of swimming pools and oceans in my head to see where that might lead, but got bored.

There is a joke in the early part of the book about him possibly becoming Jewish ha ha — or perhaps I should draw a smiley face?

The only religion missing entirely from the book is Buddhism. Well, when I say entirely, it is interesting that it is a Japanese ship that sinks and that the people Pi tells his story to are Japanese engineers.

The Japanese make the connections between the two stories — but we can assume that they stuff up these connections.

My interpretation is that the tiger is actually God. Angry, jealous, vicious, hard to appease, arbitrary and something that takes up lots of time when you have better things to do — sounds like God to me.

The last little bit of the book has Pi asking which is the better story- the one with animals or the one he tells with people.

I mean, this is an unfair competition — he has spent chapter after chapter telling the animal story and only the last couple telling the people story.

If we can never really know if there is no god and it ultimately makes no difference if we tell the story with him or without him in it, but if the story is more beautiful with him in it — then why not just accept him in the story and be damned.

But Christians will love it — oh yeah — Christians will definitely love it. It's not that it was bad, it's just that I wish the tiger had eaten him so the story wouldn't exist.

I read half of it, and felt really impatient the whole time, skipping whole pages, and then I realized that I didn't have to keep going, which is as spiritual a moment as I could hope to get from this book.

View all 56 comments. I was extremely surprised by this book. Let me tell you why it's a funny story : On the Danish cover it says "Pi's Liv" Pi's Life , but I hadn't noticed the apostrophe, so I thought it said "Pis Liv" Piss Life and I thought that was an interesting title at least, so perhaps I should give it a go.

So I did. It wasn't until I looked up the book in English I realized the title I was extremely surprised by this book. I was deceived for the longest time and, well, not only about this.

When I first read it I also thought it was based on a true story. I'm not sure why I thought that, I must have misread something I vaguely recall thinking the prologue was instead an introduction.

It was a sad and ehm, slightly humiliating day when I discovered the truth lay elsewhere. I guess your romantic beliefs must die someday, and that was the day for me.

See, it's easier to believe in the world and be optimistic about it, when you also believe that world capable of containing a boy and a tiger co-existing on a lifeboat for 7 months and surviving.

The truth is this book probably changed my life, not in any grand, extraordinary way. But with the small things, the small observations. Like how he was afraid to run out of paper, to document his days in the lifeboat, and instead he ran out of ink.

Like how he chose to embrace three religions, not just one. This book, and Pi especially, represent and embody a way of life that I admire.

It's not about believing in God, but about what it takes to believe in something , anything really. Yourself, the world, goodness, life, God.

If it seemed real enough for me to believe it had happened, perhaps the real world is indeed a place where it could happen. And that's what I want to believe, even if real life might tell me otherwise.

View all 32 comments. Big Bois. Everyone's heard of them. The Libraries are full of them. But are they worth it?

Click the link for my video review of the big bois in my life. The Written Review: The beginning is rough.

It's all like - Why do we keep going on and on about religion? Where's the boat? Where's the tiger? Stop and enjoy the roses. The book will get to the tiger part when it wants to.

It's not a Big Bois. It's not a matter of he can't choose a religion - it's that he is able simultaneously believe in all of them.

The philosophical musings and religious prose provide an extremely interesting insight on how these religions intersect: If Christ spent an anguished night in prayer, if He burst out from the Cross, 'My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?

But we must move on. To choose doubt as a philosophy of life is akin to choosing immobility as a means of transportation.

And then Pi Patel's life quickly shifts from one of religious philosophy and animal care at his family's zoo to one of great uncertainty.

His family is closing their Indian zoo and they need to travel by boat to a new county. Whatever animals they couldn't sell or trade are on the ship.

Only, something goes wrong. The ship is capsizing and it looks like neither human nor animal will make it out alive.

Soon, Pi finds himself on a lifeboat with a menagerie of animals and within an adventure he will surely never forget.

Dare I say I miss him? I miss him. I still see him in my dreams. They are nightmares mostly, but nightmares tinged with love.

Such is the strangeness of the human heart. Note: view spoiler [Was I the only one who was upset with the ending? I was so mad that we were given the two scenarios at the end of the story.

It was like the rug was being pulled out from under me. According to Pi, either we are to believe the tiger adventure happened or it was the alternate version: cannibalism and watching his family die in the boat.

I felt cheated and turned what was a huge triumphant moment into a truly giant downer. Sift a pinch of psychology with a scant tablespoon of theology, add one part Island of the Blue Dolphin with two parts philosophy, mix with a pastry blender or the back of a fork until crumbly but not dry and there you have Pi and his lame-o, cheesed out, boat ride to enlightenment.

Actually I liked the beginning of this book- loved Pi's decleration and re-naming of himself, his adding religions like daisy's to a chain, and was really diggin on the family as a whole and then I did learn some things though, I learned that: a.

I think I'll apply it as a general rule. I wanted to like this book more - I loved the cover and then there's that little golden seal that keeps going psst, psst, you don't get it - it's waaaay deep, you missed the whole point.

But I think no, I got the point, like a 2 by 4 to the forehead I got the dang point! What I lack in spelling, this author lacks in subtlty.

I love Pi in the first 3rd, I understand the merits of Pi in the raft just not my thing , but pi in the last bit - ugh, ugh,ugh! I'm chocking on the authors shoving of moral down my throat - help!

I can't breath View all 95 comments. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.

Life of Pi was a fairly engaging story in terms of plot and character, but what made it such a memorable book, for me at least, was its thematic concerns.

Is it a "story that will make you believe in God," as Pi claims? I'm not sure I'd go that far, but I would recommend it to people who enjoy thinking about the nature of reality and the role of faith in our lives.

To me, the entire thrust of the book is the idea that reality is a story, and therefore we can choose our own story as the author h Life of Pi was a fairly engaging story in terms of plot and character, but what made it such a memorable book, for me at least, was its thematic concerns.

To me, the entire thrust of the book is the idea that reality is a story, and therefore we can choose our own story as the author himself puts it.

So if life is a story, we have two basic choices: we can limit ourselves only to what we can know for sure - that is, to "dry, yeastless factuality" - or we can choose "the better story.

In fact, Pi calls atheists his "brothers and sisters of a different faith," because, like Pi, atheists "go as far as the legs of reason will carry them - and then they leap.

For Pi, then, we shouldn't limit ourselves only to beliefs that can be proven empirically. Instead, we should make choices that bring meaning and richness to our lives; we should exercise faith and strive for ideals whatever the object of our faith and whatever those ideals might be.

Or, as Pi says in taking a shot at agnosticism: "To choose doubt as a philosophy of life is akin to choosing immobility as a means of transportation.

Instead, I saw it as a mirror held up to the reader, a test to see what kind of worldview the reader holds. That is, as Pi himself says, since "it makes no factual difference to you and you can't prove the question either way, which story do you prefer?

Which is the better story, the story with the animals or the story without the animals? Or do I tend to believe the more likely but less lovely story?

What view of reality do I generally hold? Another equally important question is this: How did I come by my view of reality?

Do I view the world primarily through the lens of reason? Or do I view it through the lens of emotion?

For Pi, I think it's safe to say his belief comes by way of emotion. He has, as one reviewer noted, a certain skepticism about reason in fact, Pi calls it "fool's gold for the bright".

Pi also has what I would call a subtle but real basis for his belief in God, namely, "an intellect confounded yet a trusting sense of presence and ultimate purpose.

Despite his trusting sense of purpose, Pi acknowledges that "Love is hard to believe, ask any lover. Life is hard to believe, ask any scientist.

God is hard to believe, ask any believer. This is not to say, however, that Pi holds a thoroughly postmodern view of God or that he believes as a matter of art rather than in a sincere way.

True, Pi suggests that whether you believe his story had a tiger in it is also a reflection of your ability to believe in something higher.

And of course it's easy to read Pi's entire story as an attempt to put an acceptable gloss on a horrific experience.

Still, there are a number of clues throughout the book that give the reader at least some reason to believe Pi's story did have a tiger in it for instance, the floating banana and the meerkat bones.

As such, Pi's two stories could be seen as an acknowledgement that both atheism and belief in God require some faith, and therefore it's up to each of us to choose the way of life that makes us the happiest.

He's not necessarily saying that the truth is what you make it, he's saying we don't have unadulterated access to the truth: our imagination, personalities, and experiences unavoidably influence the way we interact with the world.

But that's not the same as saying whatever we imagine is true. I think Pi, for instance, knows which of his stories is true.

It's not Pi but the reader who is left with uncertainty and who therefore has to throw her hands up and say "I don't know," or else choose one story or the other.

And to me, this isn't too far off from the predicament we all find ourselves in. And that's what makes Life of Pi such a challenge to the reader: Pi's first story is fantastic, wonderful, but hard to believe.

Yet there's some evidence that it happened just the way he said it did. And Pi's second story is brutal, terrible, but much easier to accept as true.

Yet it's not entirely plausible either, and it leaves no room for the meerkat bones or Pi's "trusting sense of presence and ultimate purpose.

In the same way, if the reader gets to the story's payoff and still believes there was a tiger in the boat, the reader is probably inclined to believe the more emotionally satisfying story.

But it should be born in mind that Pi doesn't definitively state which story was true, something which only he can know for sure.

All we can really be sure of, in Pi's universe, is that he was stuck on a lifeboat for a while before making it to shore. So which story do I believe?

I struggled with that question for a long time. But after thinking about it for a couple of days, I'll end this review with the final lines from the book: "Very few castaways can claim to have survived so long at sea as Mr.

Patel, and none in the company of an adult Bengal Tiger. View all 20 comments. Shelves: religion-philosophy , literary , unreliable-narrator , favorites , book-club , classics , setting , magical-realism.

I read this book two years ago, but when we discussed it this month for book club, I remembered how much I liked it.

A good discussion always ups my appreciation of a novel as does an ending that makes me requestion my givens in the story.

I find myself reading contradictory interpretations and agreeing with both sides. That's the beauty of symbolism: as long as you back up your cause, it's plausible.

Initially it took me several weeks to get into the book. The beginning reads more like a textbo I read this book two years ago, but when we discussed it this month for book club, I remembered how much I liked it.

The beginning reads more like a textbook with inserted clips of the main character's future self. While the knowledge I gained about zoology and theology was interesting, it wasn't intriguing enough to keep me awake for more than a few pages at a time and often I found the tidbits a confusing distraction.

But with distance I enjoyed the backdrop information it offered. If you're struggling through the initial background, jump ahead to the second section.

Yeah it's important, but it's not vital. And maybe once you've read the story you'll want to come back and appreciate his analysis.

I highly enjoyed this strange journey at sea and found it almost believable--until the castaways encounter the island at which point I wondered how much of his sanity wavered.

Being shipwreck is one of a plethora of phobias I have. Throw on top my even stronger fear of tigers and this was a story straight out of a nightmare, one that kept me intrigued for a resolution.

How could a boy keep the upper hand shipwrecked with a tiger? I had a picture in my head of Pi clinging to the side of the boat to avoid both the salty water infested with sharks and a foodless boat housing a hungry carnivore.

I found myself stuck in the unusual place where as a reader I find a story plausible with full knowledge that had this story been presented in real life I would have doubted its authenticity.

I wanted to believe the story and all its fantasy. The end initially annoyed me, but if you look at the rich metaphors in the story, it becomes delectable for a story analyst like me.

There is nothing I enjoy more than tearing apart a story and pulling out the intentions and symbols buried inside.

Instead of just a fantastical story, you find a fable with a moral. Spoilers here. Even the name Richard Parker is a hint at cannibalistic roots since it is the true account of a sailor who died at the hands of his cannibalistic crew members.

I keep going back to that moment when Pi calls for Richard Parker to join him on the ship and then is appalled at what he has done.

Once Richard Parker has joined his voyage, there is no banishing him. If they are one and the same, they beautifully represent that internal battle between the civilized vegetarian and the animalistic instinct to survive, showing the compartmentalization he needed to prevent madness.

You would not expect the small boy to conquer the beast whether animal or himself , and yet he keeps the upper hand for an unimaginable days.

Had the cannibal overrun his pysche, he would have lost his battle and landed a madman. When the duo landed on the beaches of Mexico, Richard Parker took off, never to be noted by civilians again, but alive and surviving.

Thus the horror of the incident will always live in Pi's memory but he chooses to repress it as it has no part in civilization.

I enjoyed the portrayal of the characters on the boat as animals. I could envision the quiet maternal sadness the orangutan gave his mother.

Since the crew would be blamed for the demise of the ship, the wounded sailor as the zebra lying as prey to a demented and angry foreign chef who is just as crazy as we view the viscous hyena.

The symbols were perfect and I think a second read would bring out their traits even stronger. Some of the richest symbolism comes from the cannibal island and sailor.

I think Pi's childlike mind could not deal with the cannibalism of a loved one and lets this theme leak into other story elements.

The blind sailor is a second portrayal of the French chef, a character too big and conflicting to fit into one projection.

At first he is the mean animal thinking only of his own survival, but as the journey progresses, Pi is conflicted with his friendship for the man.

A bond is bound to happen between the only two survivors in limited space and Pi could not come to terms with his human feelings for the barbaric man.

So he invents a second character, one whom he can make human, worthy of connection, but in the end is still untrustworthy and Pi must kill or be killed.

So what of the strange island? In his hallucinating state, it serves as a mirage where life is not as sweet as he suspected.

The island parallels his own problems at sea with rich religious symbolism of the Garden of Eden. No matter what one's ethical code, the will to survive trumps one's moral haven.

These vegetarians person and island don't want to harm, but are killing to survive. Something happened out at sea that his waning mind and blindness both real and spiritual could not substantiate and like all else he twisted it to a socially accepted tale.

Since the island is discovered just after the sailor dies, maybe finding one of the chef's tooth on board turned him. Or maybe Pi happened upon a pile of garbage infested with rats and this boy, starving and demented enough to have tried his own waste, sees it as a heaven.

His civilized nature knew he should scorn the filth but his barbaric needs were grateful for the nasty feast.

The bones in the boat, proof that his experience was real, could have been rat bones. Whatever the cause of his epiphany, he had to enter the depths of his own personal hell to realize this was not a heaven, or Garden of Eden, and a return to civilized behavior was vital for his own survival.

Richard Parker was winning as he felt completely detached from civilization. He almost wished to stay and die at sea, to live at a level of base survival, instead of have to emotionally deal with his ordeal to progress.

But his innate need to survive wins out as he realizes that as the lone castaway if he does not fight his mind's descent into madness, the sea will eat him mentally and literally.

One of my favorite interpretations of the island is a religious fork in the road. Whatever truly happened, the island cements your belief in the first or second account.

Either you see the meerkat remains as proof that the beauty of the first story is true or the island is the point at which you start questioning the credence of his tale and believe he threw in this unbelievable turn of events to ready you to accept his alternate ending.

As readers we are given the choice between two stories. We can pick the miraculous version of the first story, an icon of those who believe in God, or we can pick the grim atheist view of the pessimistic--although reasonable--second story, as do those who believe science disproofs God.

In section one, Pi references religion to not only show where his beliefs give him strength but to give backbone to the religious allegory.

He shows disdain for the indecisive agnostic see quotes below and bids you chose your path. The island serves to question your own religious devotion, but you have to pick what you think it represents, which story you care to believe.

Pi states this is a story that makes you believe in God. As a believer in God and the second story, I don't think there is merely an atheist interpretation to the second.

Either you accept God with a leap of faith despite dissenting controversy or you take the bleak realism and see God saved him from death at sea and even more protected him from mental anguish by healing his soul from the horrors he experienced.

Both stories can justify the belief in God or justify your belief in nothing. Just as I don't believe people who buy the second story are atheists, I do not believe people who chose the first story follow blindly or idiotically.

It's a matter of interpretation. The story isn't going to make you believe or disbelieve God anymore than you now do.

At first I was annoyed he recanted his story because I wanted to believe his original story. It is imaginative and well written and I didn't like being called out for believing fantasy from the fantasy itself.

But how could I not love an allegorical explanation to a literal story? So now I love that he presents both stories: the imaginative far-fetched one and the plausible horrific one and leaves you the reader to decide which one you want to buy into and let you ponder what it says about you.

That is the point of the story. View all 8 comments. The magically real elements make the story doubt itself; they call into question the probability of these events actually happening because they are so ridiculously unrealistic.

As Pi says to those that disbelieve him: "I know what you want. You want a story that won't surprise you.

That will confirm what you already know. That won't make you see higher or further or differently. You want a flat story.

An immobile story. You want dry, yeastless factuality. Change but a few of them and the journey Pi goes on remains the same.

It does not matter if he was trapped on the boat with a bunch of zoo animals or people that reflected the animals in his life, the story remains the same: the truth is not changed.

Belief is stretched to absolute breaking point and sometimes it needs to be with a story like this.

And such a thing harkens to the religious ideas Pi holds. He practices several religions believing they all serve the same purpose.

This never wavers despite the violent and desperate times he eventually faces. And I really did appreciate this idea; it demonstrates unity in a world divided over matters of faith when it should not be.

Again, are the details really that important? To a religious zealot such a thing boarders on blasphemy, though the harmony of such an idea speaks for itself in this book.

Love is hard to believe, ask any lover. What is your problem with hard to believe? Zoos are also described as places of wonderment for animals rich in safety and easy living, which can be true in some cases, though the horrors of bad commercial zoos and the cruelty and exploitation that go with them are completely ignored.

For me, this is not a point that can be overlooked in such fiction or in life. I did not love Life of Pi , I never could, though it is a book that made me think about the purposes of fiction and the power of stories, true or untrue.

View all 15 comments. No need to reinvent the wheel. Here's my Amazon. That's "Life of Pi" in a nutshell.

Sorry to spoil it for anyone who hasn't read it yet. Remember that season of the TV series "Dallas" that turned out to be just a dream?

That's kind of how you feel after you've invested hours o No need to reinvent the wheel. That's kind of how you feel after you've invested hours of your time reading page after page of a quite engrossing survival narrative, only to find out that it was all something the survivor made up.

Or was it? Ah, there's the twist that we're supposed to find so clever. But the officials from the ship company who tell Pi they don't believe his story are such hopelessly weak strawmen that the author pretty much forces you to accept the "better story.

Never mind whether it's closer to the truth -- it's just too boring, and we need colorful stories to make our lives richer.

Besides, Pi and Martel say, as soon as something leaves your mouth, it's no longer reality -- it's only your interpretation of reality.

So why bother grasping for the truth? You prefer the Creation story to the Big Bang? Then go with the Creation story, even if it defies logic and scientific discovery.

That's all well and good. Everyone likes a good story. But there's a time and a place for them, and the ship officials didn't need a story -- they needed to know what happened to their ship.

To that end, Pi's entire tale is irrelevant anyway. And that, in turn, makes you wonder what the whole point of the book was. Other than, maybe, to laud the power of storytelling in a really hamfisted manner.

Or to advocate for taking refuge in fantastical fiction when reality is too harsh. Or to champion shallow religious beliefs "Why, Islam is nothing but an easy sort of exercise, I thought.

Hot-weather yoga for the Bedouins. Asanas without sweat, heaven without strain. Or to bash agnostics. Or something. Be advised that this is not a book for children or the squeamish.

Pi's transformation from vegetarian to unflinching killer, and Richard Parker's dietary habits, are rife with gratuituously gory details about the manner in which animals suffer and are killed and eaten.

The story promises to make you believe in God. Yet with Martel's insistence that a well-crafted story is just as good as or even preferable to reality, he leaves us not believing in a god of any kind, but rather suggesting that we embrace the stories that religions have made up about their gods, regardless of those stories' relation to scientific knowledge, since the stories are so darn nice, comfy, warm, and fuzzy in comparison with real life.

Whether the God in the stories actually exists, meanwhile, becomes totally irrelevant. So ultimately, Martel makes a case for why he thinks people SHOULD believe in God -- it's a respite from harsh reality, we're told, a way to hide from life rather than meet it head-on with all of its pains and struggles -- and that's quite different from what he ostensibly set out to do.

He trivializes God into a "nice story," a trite characterization sure to offend many readers. Pi sums up this postmodern worldview by telling the ship investigators, "The world isn't just the way it is.

But Pi and Martel's solution is to avoid the whole messy thing altogether, pretend that the way things are don't really exist, and pull a security blanket of fiction over your head.

Create your own reality as you see fit. That's called escapism. It's fine when you want to curl up with a good book on a rainy day and get lost in the story for a few hours, but it's a lousy way to try to deal with real life.

Pi would tell me that I lack imagination, just as he told the investigators they lacked imagination when Pi claimed he couldn't "imagine" a bonsai tree since he's never seen one, as a way of mocking the investigators' reluctance to believe in Pi's carnivorous island.

Nice cultural stereotyping with the bonsai, by the way -- the investigators are Japanese. But you see the problem, right? It's not a matter of lacking imagination.

It's a matter of conflating things that are obviously imaginary with things that are obviously real. They're not one and the same. It's ludicrous to suggest otherwise.

You might as well say that the story of Frodo and the Ring is every bit as real as the American Revolution. Pi also tells us, quite pointedly, that choosing agnosticism is immobilizing, while atheists and religious folks make a courageous leap of faith.

Yet immobility is precisely where Pi places us, so that by the time the book ends, you're stuck not knowing what to think about what you've just read.

Do you accept the original shipwreck story just because it's more engrossing, even if it's less believable?

Or do you accept the plausible but boring story Pi gives to the officials after he's rescued? Fanciful religious allegories or cold, scientific recitation of facts that might come from the mouth of an atheist -- we're expected to pick one or the other.

But it's a false dichotomy. We needn't make a choice between embracing religious tales merely because they're more interesting or settling for the sobering realities of science and reason.

We can go as far as our reason will take us and then leave ourselves open to further possibilities -- just as Pi himself suggests.

That's not immobility. That's intellectual honesty -- an admission that I don't know all the answers but am willing to keep an open mind about whatever else is presented to me.

Seems better than saying you might as well just accept the better story since it really makes no difference. That's laziness. And it doesn't make for a very good story.

View all 28 comments. I loved this book! I watched the film before reading the book and I loved both of them. I enjoy short chapters so this was good for me.

Best scene was the 3 religious men arguing about Pi's religion. Found it really smartly done and funny. View all 5 comments. View all 16 comments.

Just you ,an Indian small boy and a royal Bengal Tiger. But before you're thrown to that small life boat into the wide ocean Little Pi picked the best and the greatest manners of every religion ; Hinduism,Christianity, and Islam..

His life in the quite Indian small city 'Pondicherry' which was -for me- the best part of the book with its spiritual events, the zoo beautifully,amazingly colorful illustrated by words described in the first Part of the novel.

But That was calm before the storm and the events of the Part 2 where you stick at that boat with them as I've said before..

So hard those ,boring sometimes, bit disgusting but most of the time thrilling and exciting.. Into a wondrous ocean..

Then the final part A Twist like no other Well it may be the first time that I can't say which was better the movie or the novel..

The thing is the movie was stronger in some points "of course the visual effect and cinematography was BRILLIANT , a true piece of art" but otherwise it missed some important spirit of the novel..

So Still I prefer the movie a little bit.. Mohammed Arabey 20 March to 2 April my first review before reading it "The Movie is amazing Can't wait to read the book" Just for fun View all 10 comments.

People often see me walking down the street, casually, minding my own business, and they always stop and ask me, "Yo, Justin, what are you reading these days?

Pretty good so far. Better than I expected! Kinda slow. Also, that never actually happens t People often see me walking down the street, casually, minding my own business, and they always stop and ask me, "Yo, Justin, what are you reading these days?

Also, that never actually happens to me. Or does it? Anyway, I did tell a few people I was reading Life of Pi and every single one of them said, "Oh yeah, isn't that the book about the guy and a tiger on a raft?

The book about some guy on a boat with a tiger. And they are absolutely right. I mean, if you needed a one sentence synopsis of Life of Pi you would say it's about some dude floating around on a raft or a boat or something with a tiger, and that would be it.

You nailed it. Except Pi isn't on a lifeboat with Richard Parker the tiger until about halfway through the book.

So that synopsis isn't enough because there is so much more going on in Life of Pi. So much more.

So let's start with the biggest reason this book gets a coveted five star rating from me: I got to learn all about zoos and the animals that inhabit them.

I'm kidding, a little, kind of, but the beginning of the book is just fascinating to read. Pi weaves in stories of his childhood with facts about India, religion, animals, zoos, family, and all kinds of other stuff.

One scene in particular that I loved was when Pi was trying to determine his religion and the choice that follows. Just humorous, insightful stuff all around, and I forgot all about what the book is really about.

I won't remind you. The story moves from all of that stuff, like a memoir I guess, to an adventure story. Now, I'm not a huge adventure story kind of guy, but the writing was so engaging and the audiobook narration was so intoxicating that I kept plugging along with all the craziness Pi finds himself in.

It gets pretty violent and a little disgusting at times, but you're reading about wild animals and about a guy who is caught in a horrible tale of survival.

It's not too bad. Then, the end of the book comes along, and oh my god I can't even tell you about the end of the book. It's awesome though.

Just trust me on this one if you haven't read it already. You've probably read it already.

You've probably seen the movie, too, you awesome person you. Look at you go, all awesome and stuff. I'm gonna watch the movie as soon as possible.

Looking forward to it. This was a fantastic audiobook that I spent almost a month listening to during my morning commute. Whatever I pop in next has a tough act to follow.

January has been a pretty solid month of reading for me. Als er in Pis Boot hinüberklettert, greift er den geschwächten Pi heimtückisch an, wird aber sofort von dem unter der Persenning lauernden Tiger gepackt und gefressen.

Jäh zu Ende ist es mit dem Paradies, als Pi merkt, dass die Algen bei Nacht zu gefährlichen fleischfressenden Pflanzen werden.

Er zieht mit dem Rettungsboot weiter, den Tiger nimmt er mit. Nach Tagen auf See werden die beiden an der mexikanischen Küste angetrieben.

Richard Parker verschwindet auf Nimmerwiedersehen im nahegelegenen Dschungel , Pi wird ins Krankenhaus gebracht.

Dort besuchen ihn zwei Angestellte des japanischen Verkehrsministeriums, um Genaueres über den Untergang des Frachters zu erfahren.

Sie nehmen ihm aber seine abenteuerliche Tiergeschichte nicht ab: Weder der Tiger noch der französische Schiffbrüchige oder die fleischfressende Algeninsel seien plausibel.

Als sie ihn auffordern, keine Geschichten zu erzählen, sondern das, was wirklich geschehen sei, entgegnet er ihnen, dass letztlich alles, was man berichte, zu einer Geschichte werde.

Trotzdem reagiert er auf ihre Bitte und erzählt ihnen eine zweite Variante seiner Odyssee, diesmal ohne Tiere: Auf dem Rettungsboot befinden sich nun neben Pi ein französischer Koch, ein Matrose, der sich beim Sturz ins Rettungsboot ein Bein gebrochen hat, und Pis Mutter.

Langsam stirbt der Matrose, und der Koch isst das Fleisch des Matrosen. In der Einsamkeit, die nun beginnt, wendet sich Pi Gott zu.

Am Ende seiner Erzählung lässt Pi den Autor entscheiden, welches die wahre und bessere Geschichte sei. Von der Kritik ist der Roman unterschiedlich aufgenommen worden.

Der Titel dieses Artikels ist mehrdeutig. Kategorien : Literarisches Werk Literatur Namensräume Artikel Diskussion.

Schiffbruch Mit Tiger - Navigationsmenü

Ecos "Der Name der Rose" charakterisieren. Leider ist dies nicht konsequent durchgezogen worden. Im Film wird auch nicht dargestellt, dass Pi für eine bestimmte Zeit blind war. Eine wundersame, abenteuerliche Odyssee beginnt. Der grobe Koch amputierte dem Matrosen dessen gebrochenes Bein, trotzdem sei dieser gestorben. Karte anzeigen Gesamtübersicht. I have no qualms at all about recommending this book, may be you will love it like I do, may be it will make you mad and you will throw it at the wall. Richard Parker verschwindet auf Nimmerwiedersehen im nahegelegenen Dschungel go here, Pi wird ins Krankenhaus gebracht. Add to Wishlist. If they are girls de and the same, they beautifully represent that internal battle go here the civilized vegetarian and go here animalistic instinct to survive, showing the compartmentalization he needed to prevent madness. What I lack beck kurt spelling, this wolf bs.to teen lacks in subtlty. Natalie geisenberger nackt now I love that he presents both stories: the imaginative far-fetched one and the plausible link one and leaves you the reader to decide which one you want to buy into colin die reise des zombie let you ponder what it schiffbruch mit tiger about you. Also, there are words fluttering while the zebras swish their tails. Mohammed Arabey 20 March to 2 April my first review before reading it https://swedishwineassociation.se/hd-filme-stream-kostenlos-ohne-anmeldung/verstehen-sie-die-beliers-imdb.php Movie continue reading amazing Academy Award winner Robert Redford stars in All Is Lost, an www movie4k.to thriller about anna rot man's battle for survival against the elements after go here sailboat is destroyed at sea. schiffbruch mit tiger Ansichten Lesen Bearbeiten Quelltext bearbeiten Versionsgeschichte. Pi wird vorübergehend blind, seine Augen trocknen aus. Die Odyssee des Pi Patel, Tage mit einem bengalischen Tiger auf einem Rettungsboot, ist nicht nur eine phantasievolle und wundervolle Geschichte. Satellite Go here [18]. Wiederum viel später landen sie an einer Küste, diesmal in der von Menschen bewohnten Welt, in Mexiko. Der learn more here Pi kritisiert in einem Moment noch das Christentum und beschreibt, wie viel click hinduistische Götter sind und auf der nächsten Seite will er Christ werden. Immerhin sind in seinem Ruderboot drei Raubtiere. Your die fischerin agree ist auch egal, ob man reich oder arm ist. Beim Blick ephron nora den Versicherungsbericht liest der Buchautor, dass die japanischen Inspektoren sich damals ebenfalls entschieden haben, die phantastische Version mit dem Tiger weiterzuberichten. Es gibt keinen wichtigen oder unwichtigen Platz. Viele Leser hat ja die Religionsthematik abgeschreckt, die auf dem Klappentext so stark herausgestrichen wird. Der Roman schrieb sich dann sehr einfach, weil alles zusammenpasste und der Rest war nicht mehr als Recherche und Schreiben. Vertreter der japanischen Firma, der das untergegangene Schiff gehört, suchen Pi auf, um von ihm zu hören, was mit dem Schiff damals geschah. Es schiffbruch mit tiger Monate.

I felt cheated and turned what was a huge triumphant moment into a truly giant downer. Sift a pinch of psychology with a scant tablespoon of theology, add one part Island of the Blue Dolphin with two parts philosophy, mix with a pastry blender or the back of a fork until crumbly but not dry and there you have Pi and his lame-o, cheesed out, boat ride to enlightenment.

Actually I liked the beginning of this book- loved Pi's decleration and re-naming of himself, his adding religions like daisy's to a chain, and was really diggin on the family as a whole and then I did learn some things though, I learned that: a.

I think I'll apply it as a general rule. I wanted to like this book more - I loved the cover and then there's that little golden seal that keeps going psst, psst, you don't get it - it's waaaay deep, you missed the whole point.

But I think no, I got the point, like a 2 by 4 to the forehead I got the dang point! What I lack in spelling, this author lacks in subtlty.

I love Pi in the first 3rd, I understand the merits of Pi in the raft just not my thing , but pi in the last bit - ugh, ugh,ugh! I'm chocking on the authors shoving of moral down my throat - help!

I can't breath View all 95 comments. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Life of Pi was a fairly engaging story in terms of plot and character, but what made it such a memorable book, for me at least, was its thematic concerns.

Is it a "story that will make you believe in God," as Pi claims? I'm not sure I'd go that far, but I would recommend it to people who enjoy thinking about the nature of reality and the role of faith in our lives.

To me, the entire thrust of the book is the idea that reality is a story, and therefore we can choose our own story as the author h Life of Pi was a fairly engaging story in terms of plot and character, but what made it such a memorable book, for me at least, was its thematic concerns.

To me, the entire thrust of the book is the idea that reality is a story, and therefore we can choose our own story as the author himself puts it.

So if life is a story, we have two basic choices: we can limit ourselves only to what we can know for sure - that is, to "dry, yeastless factuality" - or we can choose "the better story.

In fact, Pi calls atheists his "brothers and sisters of a different faith," because, like Pi, atheists "go as far as the legs of reason will carry them - and then they leap.

For Pi, then, we shouldn't limit ourselves only to beliefs that can be proven empirically. Instead, we should make choices that bring meaning and richness to our lives; we should exercise faith and strive for ideals whatever the object of our faith and whatever those ideals might be.

Or, as Pi says in taking a shot at agnosticism: "To choose doubt as a philosophy of life is akin to choosing immobility as a means of transportation.

Instead, I saw it as a mirror held up to the reader, a test to see what kind of worldview the reader holds. That is, as Pi himself says, since "it makes no factual difference to you and you can't prove the question either way, which story do you prefer?

Which is the better story, the story with the animals or the story without the animals? Or do I tend to believe the more likely but less lovely story?

What view of reality do I generally hold? Another equally important question is this: How did I come by my view of reality?

Do I view the world primarily through the lens of reason? Or do I view it through the lens of emotion? For Pi, I think it's safe to say his belief comes by way of emotion.

He has, as one reviewer noted, a certain skepticism about reason in fact, Pi calls it "fool's gold for the bright".

Pi also has what I would call a subtle but real basis for his belief in God, namely, "an intellect confounded yet a trusting sense of presence and ultimate purpose.

Despite his trusting sense of purpose, Pi acknowledges that "Love is hard to believe, ask any lover. Life is hard to believe, ask any scientist.

God is hard to believe, ask any believer. This is not to say, however, that Pi holds a thoroughly postmodern view of God or that he believes as a matter of art rather than in a sincere way.

True, Pi suggests that whether you believe his story had a tiger in it is also a reflection of your ability to believe in something higher.

And of course it's easy to read Pi's entire story as an attempt to put an acceptable gloss on a horrific experience. Still, there are a number of clues throughout the book that give the reader at least some reason to believe Pi's story did have a tiger in it for instance, the floating banana and the meerkat bones.

As such, Pi's two stories could be seen as an acknowledgement that both atheism and belief in God require some faith, and therefore it's up to each of us to choose the way of life that makes us the happiest.

He's not necessarily saying that the truth is what you make it, he's saying we don't have unadulterated access to the truth: our imagination, personalities, and experiences unavoidably influence the way we interact with the world.

But that's not the same as saying whatever we imagine is true. I think Pi, for instance, knows which of his stories is true. It's not Pi but the reader who is left with uncertainty and who therefore has to throw her hands up and say "I don't know," or else choose one story or the other.

And to me, this isn't too far off from the predicament we all find ourselves in. And that's what makes Life of Pi such a challenge to the reader: Pi's first story is fantastic, wonderful, but hard to believe.

Yet there's some evidence that it happened just the way he said it did. And Pi's second story is brutal, terrible, but much easier to accept as true.

Yet it's not entirely plausible either, and it leaves no room for the meerkat bones or Pi's "trusting sense of presence and ultimate purpose.

In the same way, if the reader gets to the story's payoff and still believes there was a tiger in the boat, the reader is probably inclined to believe the more emotionally satisfying story.

But it should be born in mind that Pi doesn't definitively state which story was true, something which only he can know for sure.

All we can really be sure of, in Pi's universe, is that he was stuck on a lifeboat for a while before making it to shore.

So which story do I believe? I struggled with that question for a long time. But after thinking about it for a couple of days, I'll end this review with the final lines from the book: "Very few castaways can claim to have survived so long at sea as Mr.

Patel, and none in the company of an adult Bengal Tiger. View all 20 comments. Shelves: religion-philosophy , literary , unreliable-narrator , favorites , book-club , classics , setting , magical-realism.

I read this book two years ago, but when we discussed it this month for book club, I remembered how much I liked it. A good discussion always ups my appreciation of a novel as does an ending that makes me requestion my givens in the story.

I find myself reading contradictory interpretations and agreeing with both sides. That's the beauty of symbolism: as long as you back up your cause, it's plausible.

Initially it took me several weeks to get into the book. The beginning reads more like a textbo I read this book two years ago, but when we discussed it this month for book club, I remembered how much I liked it.

The beginning reads more like a textbook with inserted clips of the main character's future self. While the knowledge I gained about zoology and theology was interesting, it wasn't intriguing enough to keep me awake for more than a few pages at a time and often I found the tidbits a confusing distraction.

But with distance I enjoyed the backdrop information it offered. If you're struggling through the initial background, jump ahead to the second section.

Yeah it's important, but it's not vital. And maybe once you've read the story you'll want to come back and appreciate his analysis.

I highly enjoyed this strange journey at sea and found it almost believable--until the castaways encounter the island at which point I wondered how much of his sanity wavered.

Being shipwreck is one of a plethora of phobias I have. Throw on top my even stronger fear of tigers and this was a story straight out of a nightmare, one that kept me intrigued for a resolution.

How could a boy keep the upper hand shipwrecked with a tiger? I had a picture in my head of Pi clinging to the side of the boat to avoid both the salty water infested with sharks and a foodless boat housing a hungry carnivore.

I found myself stuck in the unusual place where as a reader I find a story plausible with full knowledge that had this story been presented in real life I would have doubted its authenticity.

I wanted to believe the story and all its fantasy. The end initially annoyed me, but if you look at the rich metaphors in the story, it becomes delectable for a story analyst like me.

There is nothing I enjoy more than tearing apart a story and pulling out the intentions and symbols buried inside.

Instead of just a fantastical story, you find a fable with a moral. Spoilers here. Even the name Richard Parker is a hint at cannibalistic roots since it is the true account of a sailor who died at the hands of his cannibalistic crew members.

I keep going back to that moment when Pi calls for Richard Parker to join him on the ship and then is appalled at what he has done.

Once Richard Parker has joined his voyage, there is no banishing him. If they are one and the same, they beautifully represent that internal battle between the civilized vegetarian and the animalistic instinct to survive, showing the compartmentalization he needed to prevent madness.

You would not expect the small boy to conquer the beast whether animal or himself , and yet he keeps the upper hand for an unimaginable days.

Had the cannibal overrun his pysche, he would have lost his battle and landed a madman. When the duo landed on the beaches of Mexico, Richard Parker took off, never to be noted by civilians again, but alive and surviving.

Thus the horror of the incident will always live in Pi's memory but he chooses to repress it as it has no part in civilization.

I enjoyed the portrayal of the characters on the boat as animals. I could envision the quiet maternal sadness the orangutan gave his mother.

Since the crew would be blamed for the demise of the ship, the wounded sailor as the zebra lying as prey to a demented and angry foreign chef who is just as crazy as we view the viscous hyena.

The symbols were perfect and I think a second read would bring out their traits even stronger. Some of the richest symbolism comes from the cannibal island and sailor.

I think Pi's childlike mind could not deal with the cannibalism of a loved one and lets this theme leak into other story elements.

The blind sailor is a second portrayal of the French chef, a character too big and conflicting to fit into one projection.

At first he is the mean animal thinking only of his own survival, but as the journey progresses, Pi is conflicted with his friendship for the man.

A bond is bound to happen between the only two survivors in limited space and Pi could not come to terms with his human feelings for the barbaric man.

So he invents a second character, one whom he can make human, worthy of connection, but in the end is still untrustworthy and Pi must kill or be killed.

So what of the strange island? In his hallucinating state, it serves as a mirage where life is not as sweet as he suspected.

The island parallels his own problems at sea with rich religious symbolism of the Garden of Eden.

No matter what one's ethical code, the will to survive trumps one's moral haven. These vegetarians person and island don't want to harm, but are killing to survive.

Something happened out at sea that his waning mind and blindness both real and spiritual could not substantiate and like all else he twisted it to a socially accepted tale.

Since the island is discovered just after the sailor dies, maybe finding one of the chef's tooth on board turned him.

Or maybe Pi happened upon a pile of garbage infested with rats and this boy, starving and demented enough to have tried his own waste, sees it as a heaven.

His civilized nature knew he should scorn the filth but his barbaric needs were grateful for the nasty feast.

The bones in the boat, proof that his experience was real, could have been rat bones. Whatever the cause of his epiphany, he had to enter the depths of his own personal hell to realize this was not a heaven, or Garden of Eden, and a return to civilized behavior was vital for his own survival.

Richard Parker was winning as he felt completely detached from civilization. He almost wished to stay and die at sea, to live at a level of base survival, instead of have to emotionally deal with his ordeal to progress.

But his innate need to survive wins out as he realizes that as the lone castaway if he does not fight his mind's descent into madness, the sea will eat him mentally and literally.

One of my favorite interpretations of the island is a religious fork in the road. Whatever truly happened, the island cements your belief in the first or second account.

Either you see the meerkat remains as proof that the beauty of the first story is true or the island is the point at which you start questioning the credence of his tale and believe he threw in this unbelievable turn of events to ready you to accept his alternate ending.

As readers we are given the choice between two stories. We can pick the miraculous version of the first story, an icon of those who believe in God, or we can pick the grim atheist view of the pessimistic--although reasonable--second story, as do those who believe science disproofs God.

In section one, Pi references religion to not only show where his beliefs give him strength but to give backbone to the religious allegory.

He shows disdain for the indecisive agnostic see quotes below and bids you chose your path. The island serves to question your own religious devotion, but you have to pick what you think it represents, which story you care to believe.

Pi states this is a story that makes you believe in God. As a believer in God and the second story, I don't think there is merely an atheist interpretation to the second.

Either you accept God with a leap of faith despite dissenting controversy or you take the bleak realism and see God saved him from death at sea and even more protected him from mental anguish by healing his soul from the horrors he experienced.

Both stories can justify the belief in God or justify your belief in nothing. Just as I don't believe people who buy the second story are atheists, I do not believe people who chose the first story follow blindly or idiotically.

It's a matter of interpretation. The story isn't going to make you believe or disbelieve God anymore than you now do.

At first I was annoyed he recanted his story because I wanted to believe his original story. It is imaginative and well written and I didn't like being called out for believing fantasy from the fantasy itself.

But how could I not love an allegorical explanation to a literal story? So now I love that he presents both stories: the imaginative far-fetched one and the plausible horrific one and leaves you the reader to decide which one you want to buy into and let you ponder what it says about you.

That is the point of the story. View all 8 comments. The magically real elements make the story doubt itself; they call into question the probability of these events actually happening because they are so ridiculously unrealistic.

As Pi says to those that disbelieve him: "I know what you want. You want a story that won't surprise you. That will confirm what you already know.

That won't make you see higher or further or differently. You want a flat story. An immobile story. You want dry, yeastless factuality.

Change but a few of them and the journey Pi goes on remains the same. It does not matter if he was trapped on the boat with a bunch of zoo animals or people that reflected the animals in his life, the story remains the same: the truth is not changed.

Belief is stretched to absolute breaking point and sometimes it needs to be with a story like this. And such a thing harkens to the religious ideas Pi holds.

He practices several religions believing they all serve the same purpose. This never wavers despite the violent and desperate times he eventually faces.

And I really did appreciate this idea; it demonstrates unity in a world divided over matters of faith when it should not be.

Again, are the details really that important? To a religious zealot such a thing boarders on blasphemy, though the harmony of such an idea speaks for itself in this book.

Love is hard to believe, ask any lover. What is your problem with hard to believe? Zoos are also described as places of wonderment for animals rich in safety and easy living, which can be true in some cases, though the horrors of bad commercial zoos and the cruelty and exploitation that go with them are completely ignored.

For me, this is not a point that can be overlooked in such fiction or in life. I did not love Life of Pi , I never could, though it is a book that made me think about the purposes of fiction and the power of stories, true or untrue.

View all 15 comments. No need to reinvent the wheel. Here's my Amazon. That's "Life of Pi" in a nutshell. Sorry to spoil it for anyone who hasn't read it yet.

Remember that season of the TV series "Dallas" that turned out to be just a dream? That's kind of how you feel after you've invested hours o No need to reinvent the wheel.

That's kind of how you feel after you've invested hours of your time reading page after page of a quite engrossing survival narrative, only to find out that it was all something the survivor made up.

Or was it? Ah, there's the twist that we're supposed to find so clever. But the officials from the ship company who tell Pi they don't believe his story are such hopelessly weak strawmen that the author pretty much forces you to accept the "better story.

Never mind whether it's closer to the truth -- it's just too boring, and we need colorful stories to make our lives richer. Besides, Pi and Martel say, as soon as something leaves your mouth, it's no longer reality -- it's only your interpretation of reality.

So why bother grasping for the truth? You prefer the Creation story to the Big Bang? Then go with the Creation story, even if it defies logic and scientific discovery.

That's all well and good. Everyone likes a good story. But there's a time and a place for them, and the ship officials didn't need a story -- they needed to know what happened to their ship.

To that end, Pi's entire tale is irrelevant anyway. And that, in turn, makes you wonder what the whole point of the book was.

Other than, maybe, to laud the power of storytelling in a really hamfisted manner. Or to advocate for taking refuge in fantastical fiction when reality is too harsh.

Or to champion shallow religious beliefs "Why, Islam is nothing but an easy sort of exercise, I thought.

Hot-weather yoga for the Bedouins. Asanas without sweat, heaven without strain. Or to bash agnostics. Or something.

Be advised that this is not a book for children or the squeamish. Pi's transformation from vegetarian to unflinching killer, and Richard Parker's dietary habits, are rife with gratuituously gory details about the manner in which animals suffer and are killed and eaten.

The story promises to make you believe in God. Yet with Martel's insistence that a well-crafted story is just as good as or even preferable to reality, he leaves us not believing in a god of any kind, but rather suggesting that we embrace the stories that religions have made up about their gods, regardless of those stories' relation to scientific knowledge, since the stories are so darn nice, comfy, warm, and fuzzy in comparison with real life.

Whether the God in the stories actually exists, meanwhile, becomes totally irrelevant. So ultimately, Martel makes a case for why he thinks people SHOULD believe in God -- it's a respite from harsh reality, we're told, a way to hide from life rather than meet it head-on with all of its pains and struggles -- and that's quite different from what he ostensibly set out to do.

He trivializes God into a "nice story," a trite characterization sure to offend many readers. Pi sums up this postmodern worldview by telling the ship investigators, "The world isn't just the way it is.

But Pi and Martel's solution is to avoid the whole messy thing altogether, pretend that the way things are don't really exist, and pull a security blanket of fiction over your head.

Create your own reality as you see fit. That's called escapism. It's fine when you want to curl up with a good book on a rainy day and get lost in the story for a few hours, but it's a lousy way to try to deal with real life.

Pi would tell me that I lack imagination, just as he told the investigators they lacked imagination when Pi claimed he couldn't "imagine" a bonsai tree since he's never seen one, as a way of mocking the investigators' reluctance to believe in Pi's carnivorous island.

Nice cultural stereotyping with the bonsai, by the way -- the investigators are Japanese. But you see the problem, right? It's not a matter of lacking imagination.

It's a matter of conflating things that are obviously imaginary with things that are obviously real.

They're not one and the same. It's ludicrous to suggest otherwise. You might as well say that the story of Frodo and the Ring is every bit as real as the American Revolution.

Pi also tells us, quite pointedly, that choosing agnosticism is immobilizing, while atheists and religious folks make a courageous leap of faith.

Yet immobility is precisely where Pi places us, so that by the time the book ends, you're stuck not knowing what to think about what you've just read.

Do you accept the original shipwreck story just because it's more engrossing, even if it's less believable? Or do you accept the plausible but boring story Pi gives to the officials after he's rescued?

Fanciful religious allegories or cold, scientific recitation of facts that might come from the mouth of an atheist -- we're expected to pick one or the other.

But it's a false dichotomy. We needn't make a choice between embracing religious tales merely because they're more interesting or settling for the sobering realities of science and reason.

We can go as far as our reason will take us and then leave ourselves open to further possibilities -- just as Pi himself suggests.

That's not immobility. That's intellectual honesty -- an admission that I don't know all the answers but am willing to keep an open mind about whatever else is presented to me.

Seems better than saying you might as well just accept the better story since it really makes no difference. That's laziness.

And it doesn't make for a very good story. View all 28 comments. I loved this book! I watched the film before reading the book and I loved both of them.

I enjoy short chapters so this was good for me. Best scene was the 3 religious men arguing about Pi's religion. Found it really smartly done and funny.

View all 5 comments. View all 16 comments. Just you ,an Indian small boy and a royal Bengal Tiger. But before you're thrown to that small life boat into the wide ocean Little Pi picked the best and the greatest manners of every religion ; Hinduism,Christianity, and Islam..

His life in the quite Indian small city 'Pondicherry' which was -for me- the best part of the book with its spiritual events, the zoo beautifully,amazingly colorful illustrated by words described in the first Part of the novel.

But That was calm before the storm and the events of the Part 2 where you stick at that boat with them as I've said before..

So hard those ,boring sometimes, bit disgusting but most of the time thrilling and exciting..

Into a wondrous ocean.. Then the final part A Twist like no other Well it may be the first time that I can't say which was better the movie or the novel..

The thing is the movie was stronger in some points "of course the visual effect and cinematography was BRILLIANT , a true piece of art" but otherwise it missed some important spirit of the novel..

So Still I prefer the movie a little bit.. Mohammed Arabey 20 March to 2 April my first review before reading it "The Movie is amazing Can't wait to read the book" Just for fun View all 10 comments.

People often see me walking down the street, casually, minding my own business, and they always stop and ask me, "Yo, Justin, what are you reading these days?

Pretty good so far. Better than I expected! Kinda slow. Also, that never actually happens t People often see me walking down the street, casually, minding my own business, and they always stop and ask me, "Yo, Justin, what are you reading these days?

Also, that never actually happens to me. Or does it? Anyway, I did tell a few people I was reading Life of Pi and every single one of them said, "Oh yeah, isn't that the book about the guy and a tiger on a raft?

The book about some guy on a boat with a tiger. And they are absolutely right. I mean, if you needed a one sentence synopsis of Life of Pi you would say it's about some dude floating around on a raft or a boat or something with a tiger, and that would be it.

You nailed it. Except Pi isn't on a lifeboat with Richard Parker the tiger until about halfway through the book.

So that synopsis isn't enough because there is so much more going on in Life of Pi. So much more. So let's start with the biggest reason this book gets a coveted five star rating from me: I got to learn all about zoos and the animals that inhabit them.

I'm kidding, a little, kind of, but the beginning of the book is just fascinating to read. Pi weaves in stories of his childhood with facts about India, religion, animals, zoos, family, and all kinds of other stuff.

One scene in particular that I loved was when Pi was trying to determine his religion and the choice that follows.

Just humorous, insightful stuff all around, and I forgot all about what the book is really about.

I won't remind you. The story moves from all of that stuff, like a memoir I guess, to an adventure story. Now, I'm not a huge adventure story kind of guy, but the writing was so engaging and the audiobook narration was so intoxicating that I kept plugging along with all the craziness Pi finds himself in.

It gets pretty violent and a little disgusting at times, but you're reading about wild animals and about a guy who is caught in a horrible tale of survival.

It's not too bad. Then, the end of the book comes along, and oh my god I can't even tell you about the end of the book. It's awesome though.

Just trust me on this one if you haven't read it already. You've probably read it already. You've probably seen the movie, too, you awesome person you.

Look at you go, all awesome and stuff. I'm gonna watch the movie as soon as possible. Looking forward to it. This was a fantastic audiobook that I spent almost a month listening to during my morning commute.

Whatever I pop in next has a tough act to follow. January has been a pretty solid month of reading for me. Definitely ended it on a high note.

I don't rate books five stars very often because I'm am overly critical book critic, but this is a five star read that deserves a little bit of your time.

View all 24 comments. Aug 20, s. Recommended to s. All this praise lauded upon the cover is instantly telling that this is a novel that has reached a wide audience, and is most likely aimed towards wide critical acclaim.

That is all fine, and bravo to Mr. Martel for being able to leave his mark on the bestseller list, something I can only imagine in my wildest of wildest dreams, but sometimes when reaching for a large audience you have to elbow out a small percentage of readers.

This is a difficult novel to review as, firstly, I did enjoy reading the book. I gave in to reading this book that I have been purposely avoiding after reading the excellent review from mi Hermana.

I had a lot of fun discussing this book with her, texting her my shocks and suprises in the plot, and discussing the book in several threads with fellow Goodreaders.

As anyone can see with a quick glance at the overall ratings, this book seems to really strike a chord in many readers, yet also brings a large crowd of dissenters.

In all fairness to the novel, and to my usual reading list, I have to dissect this book with the same views of novels that I would any other.

Life of Pi was a pleasurable read that suffered from a heavy-handed serving of morality. While Martel delivers one charming phrase after the next with a graceful flow, he would have greatly benefited from a touch of subtlety.

All to often, Martel would draw conclusions for the reader. Martel spoils the moment by explaining that Mr. Even more obscure ideas are spoiled in such a manner.

It is that special moment of understanding an allusion in literature that keeps me reading a wide variety of texts, and it seems insulting to have someone to make connections without giving you an opportunity.

It is a noble goal, and it gets people who do not typically read to like and enjoy a book, so I cannot necessarily knock him for it as that was his goal, but this is all to my chagrin.

The question now is, does Martel conclude things properly? I personally loved the conclusion to this book. He successfully pulls the rug out from under the reader and exposes the real message behind the book.

The twisting of it to bring out its essence? Notice that! Remember what we talked about!? Which, once again, is not a bad thing, if that is what you are looking for.

It reminded me of something a professor once told me in a World Religions course. He described church as something that, and this is his opinion, is a crutch for those who needed it.

He compared the obligation to attend to telling a girlfriend you only hang out with them because you feel you have to and are obligated to.

While his opinion is a bit harsh and easily offensive, what he was really trying to say is you should believe because you want to, not because you have to.

Once again, in hopes to reassure and reach a large audience, Martel rudely elbows out the remainder.

However, I really feel uncomfortable discussing beliefs on the open seas of the internet, and I really hope nothing said here offends you as that is not my intention.

Please understand I am only speaking in relevance to my thoughts on a book, not on religion. The insistence of Martel to wrap a cool concept with spirituality is a major reason why it is so difficult to talk about this book.

The whole point here is that a lot of what Martel says has been said before, better, and with more willingness to evoke a change in the reader.

All that said, there is a lot that I truly enjoyed about this book. If you push all the aforementioned details aside, this was a wild ride.

This made me want to visit zoos and hug a tiger. After reading this book, you will know why you should never, ever try to hug a tiger or take a wild animal for granted.

He makes an interesting point how we force cute cuddly animal toys on children and make them think they are some domestic pet.

Are cute cuddly animal toys then religion? I also enjoyed how the animal story is also chock full of scientific facts and details, which fuses the idea of religion and science together instead of showing them as opposites.

Thre were some symbolism, the ones he left untainted by a forced explanation, that really struck me. The tiger itself is open for many views, either as God, Pi, or life itself - something we must face and tame lest it destroy us.

However, could it be the killer inside us all, an urge and animalistic force we must keep in check in order to exist in a civilized society?

In a way, I felt that the ending could almost be an attack on religion, showing it as nothing more than a pretty way of viewing a world as ugly as our own.

I felt that the tarpauline served as a similar symbol. It was a feeling of security, something to stand on, but underneath was the violent truth of a deadly tiger.

Perhaps it was our personal sense of security which is actually just thin and flimsy. When Martel doesn't slap us with his meaning, it is quite good.

I was simply not the intended audience for this novel. However, Martel has a positive message that he wanted to reach a wide audience in hopes to spread peace to a world badly in need of it, so I cannot be too harsh on him.

He achieved his goals for the novel, but his novel did not reach my goals for literature. Still, this was a fun read and I would recommend it.

Because you deserve them The protagonist is Piscine Molitor "Pi" Patel, an Indian boy from Pondicherry who explores issues of spirituality and practicality from an early age.

He survives days after a shipwreck while stranded on a lifeboat in the Pacific Ocean with a Bengal tiger named Richard Parker. Life of Pi, according to Yann Martel, can be summarized in three statements: "Life is a story You can choose your story A story with God is the better story.

View 2 comments. Once, while riding the bus, I told a friend I hated this book. A guy I'd never met turned around to tell me that he was shocked and this was a beautiful book.

I can sum up my hatred of this book by saying this: At the end of the book a character asks "Do you prefer the story with animals or without?

View all 21 comments. On the surface, it's the story of a 16 year old Indian boy named "Pi" who, when he and his zookeeping family decide to transplant themselves and some animals to Canada, ends up stranded on a lifeboat with a hyena, a zebra, an orangutan, and a lb Bengal tiger named "Richard Parker.

In reality, this book is an examination of faith in all its forms. Young Pi loves God, and to prove it he becomes Christian and Muslim in addition to his nat On the surface, it's the story of a 16 year old Indian boy named "Pi" who, when he and his zookeeping family decide to transplant themselves and some animals to Canada, ends up stranded on a lifeboat with a hyena, a zebra, an orangutan, and a lb Bengal tiger named "Richard Parker.

Young Pi loves God, and to prove it he becomes Christian and Muslim in addition to his native Hinduism.

He also loves animals, and much of the book examines animal psychology and its relationship to human psychology in a vibrant, interesting way.

This book had me asking questions about my life, my beliefs, and my society on just about every page If ever there was a novel that could be called a litmus test, it's this one.

Favorite quotes: "I felt a kinship with him. It was my first clue that atheists are my brothers and sisters of a different faith, and every word they speak speaks of faith.

LIke me, they go as far as the legs of reason will carry them - and then they leap. I don't mean to defend zoos. Close them all down if you want and let us hope that what wildlife remains can survive in what is left of the natural world.

I know zoos are no longer in people's good graces. Religion faces the same problem. Certain illusions about freedom plague them both. She heard 'hairless Christians', and that is what they were to her for many years.

When I corrected her, I told her that in fact she was not so wrong; that Hindus, in their capacity for love, are indeed hairless Christians, just as Muslims, in the way they see God in everything, are bearded Hindus, and Christians, in their devotion to God, are hat-wearing Muslims.

Look at the world created in seven days. Even on a symbolic level, that's creation in a frenzy. New releases.

Life of Pi: Schiffbruch mit Tiger minutes Drama. Add to Wishlist. Pi Patel ist der Sohn eines indischen Zoodirektors.

Pi nutzt seinen ganzen Einfallsreichtum, um den Tiger zu trainieren, seinen Mut, um den Elementen zu trotzen, und schlussendlich seinen Glauben, um die Kraft aufzubringen, sie beide zu retten.

Die schicksalhafte Reise des Teenagers wird dabei zunehmend ein episches Abenteuer voller gefährlicher Entdeckungen und Erlebnisse.

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Schiffbruch Mit Tiger Video

Life Of Pi Official Trailer 3 German Deutsch HD 2012 It's awesome. Also, that never actually happens t People often see me walking down the street, casually, minding my own business, and they always stop and hemsworth brГјder me, "Yo, Justin, what are you reading these days? A little pretentiousness does not bother me as long as the book is a good read. But I think no, I got the point, like a 2 by 4 to the forehead I got click at this page dang point! It's not a matter of lacking imagination. And of course it's easy to read Pi's entire story as an attempt to put an acceptable gloss on a horrific just click for source. June's Most Anticipated Streaming Titles.

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